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Atrocities and confession in Northern Victoria

There are stories up around North-Central Victoria and even right across the country of black shoots. One story comes to mind. A man who used to go to church in regional Victoria many years ago. On his death bed spoke to an Aboriginal pastor. He told of how after church on Sunday, the men from  Full Article…

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Contact turns to conflict on the Murray

First contact may have been peaceful. But it wasn’t long before there was a lot of resistance around Moira station. It’s well documented in books such as ‘The Black Resistance’. More than flare-ups, there were planned attacks on Moira Station and other surrounding stations. Many sheep and cattle were killed in an attempt to persuade  Full Article…

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Kitty, the great mother

Of all the matriarchs in recent Indigenous history, few are more significant than Kitty. She was the Mother of William Cooper, was born in the early to mid 1820s, before settlement, or white settlement in that area. Kitty was from the Wollithiga or Wallithica Tribe. Kitty, it is said, was born near the Moira Lakes,  Full Article…

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The Atkinsons and Mr Oldbury

One of the most famous names in the Indigenous community – from Cummeragunja right up to Yarrabah – is Atkinson. And many of them, probably, link back to one man. James John Oldbury Atkinson, known as John Oldbury Atkinson, came to Moira Station in 1843 and became the overseer of the station for the next  Full Article…

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William Cooper’s early years – in black and white

William Cooper fully identified as an Aboriginal man. But he never denied that he was also “European.” He was very much aware of his heritage on both sides. William was the son of Kitty. Her surname was, sometimes Atkinson, sometimes Cooper. She was earlier known as Kitty Lewis possibly because of the original owner of  Full Article…

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Alick Jackomos – the black and white link

Almost everybody thought Alick Jackomos was a black fella. Probably Yorta Yorta. His wife was. His kids were. And with his olive skin and broad cheeks, he looked the part. More importantly, he sounded Aboriginal and thought Aboriginal. But he was actually a good Greek kid from Carlton. But the reason he was so deep  Full Article…

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Pastor Doug – a life of partnerships

If anyone had reason to be steer clear of whitefellas, it was Douglas Nicholls. He’d seen respectable policemen take Koorie girls away from his community in Cummeragunja. His recollection, and a report in the Daily Telegraph on 13.2.1929 gave the troubling picture: One day in 1918, the manager of Cumeroogunga arranged with a Moama police  Full Article…

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Vincent Lingiari and His Friends

History loves a hero. And Vincent Lingiari is the genuine article. While he could not read or write, he was able to wear down the establishment, without any use of arms. His battle was won purely by the power of words and ideas. It’s well known that Lingiari led the Wave Hill walk off. And  Full Article…

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Ellen Giles – From wilderness to mission to community

A marvellous traveller, Ellen was born to Billy and Biddy Giles, Indigenous people who were local to the Georges River in the 1860s. Their married life – and, apparently, enjoyed easy interaction with white settlers. This positive contact seemed to have cascaded down to Ellen in the way she lived her life and started new  Full Article…

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