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Archive | April, 2013

Alick Jackomos – the black and white link

Almost everybody thought Alick Jackomos was a black fella. Probably Yorta Yorta. His wife was. His kids were. And with his olive skin and broad cheeks, he looked the part. More importantly, he sounded Aboriginal and thought Aboriginal. But he was actually a good Greek kid from Carlton. But the reason he was so deep  Full Article…

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Pastor Doug – a life of partnerships

If anyone had reason to be steer clear of whitefellas, it was Douglas Nicholls. He’d seen respectable policemen take Koorie girls away from his community in Cummeragunja. His recollection, and a report in the Daily Telegraph on 13.2.1929 gave the troubling picture: One day in 1918, the manager of Cumeroogunga arranged with a Moama police  Full Article…

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Vincent Lingiari and His Friends

History loves a hero. And Vincent Lingiari is the genuine article. While he could not read or write, he was able to wear down the establishment, without any use of arms. His battle was won purely by the power of words and ideas. It’s well known that Lingiari led the Wave Hill walk off. And  Full Article…

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Ellen Giles – From wilderness to mission to community

A marvellous traveller, Ellen was born to Billy and Biddy Giles, Indigenous people who were local to the Georges River in the 1860s. Their married life – and, apparently, enjoyed easy interaction with white settlers. This positive contact seemed to have cascaded down to Ellen in the way she lived her life and started new  Full Article…

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Emma Timbery. Aboriginal mother to blacks – and whites.

Emma Timberery was born to Betsey, an Aboriginal woman from Liverpool; and Jimmy Lowndes, a Dharawal man. (His may have been a white man, named Lowndes, working on William Macarthur’s estate in Camden. And, it’s said, he’d been hidden rom tribesmen wanting to wipe out “half-castes” like him, by a senior Dharwal man, called Bradbury.)  Full Article…

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William Cooper, John Needham and the Creation of NAIDOC

After some promising discussions with Prime Minister Joseph Lyons in the late 1930s, it became clear to William Cooper and his colleagues at the Australian Aborigines’ League that the federal government was not going to do anything for the Indigenous cause. The cabinet was stonewalling the Petition to the King. The message came back to  Full Article…

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Joan Kingsley-Strack Lectures the Judge

She was a good North Shore housewife. A church-goer with a country lady’s sensibilities. And she was a royal pain in the posterior to the Aboriginal Protection Board. Joan Kingsely-Strack was a friend of Pearl Gibbs and William Ferguson. A friendship that began when she attended the “1937 New South Wales Select Committee Enquiry into  Full Article…

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When the Aborigines fought for the the Missionary

Between 1913 and 1914 the residents of the Lake Tyers Aboriginal Station waged a campaign to allow Caroline Bulmer, the widow of their late missionary, to remain on the station with them. Preparing two separate petitions, the first to the Victorian Board for the Protection of Aborigines, and the second to the Governor of Victoria,  Full Article…

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William Ferguson returns

William Ferguson had been born at Darlington Point. Nearing the end of his life, he was giving Aboriginal people of that district the voice they never had.

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