The Walk Off

WHY BLACKS LEFT The case for the aborigines who deserted from the Cumeroogunga Station and crossed the Murray River into Victoria was explained yesterday by Mr. William Cooper, secretary of the Australian Abo- rigines' League. At no time since the station was estab- lished in 1886 had conditions been so bad as at present, said Mr. Cooper. The in- mates had sent a complaint to him some time ago. It said that they had been talking for years of walking off the station to bring their plight to the notice of white people. The ration given to them was inadequate. Adults received rations valued at 3/6 a week, and children a half-ration valued at 1/9 a week. This was the cause of malnutrition and high mortality, especially among the children.

WHY BLACKS LEFT
The case for the aborigines who deserted from the Cumeroogunga Station and crossed the Murray River into Victoria was explained yesterday by Mr. William Cooper, secretary of the Australian Abo- rigines’ League.
At no time since the station was estab- lished in 1886 had conditions been so bad as at present, said Mr. Cooper. The in- mates had sent a complaint to him some time ago. It said that they had been talking for years of walking off the station to bring their plight to the notice of white people. The ration given to them was inadequate. Adults received rations valued at 3/6 a week, and children a half-ration valued at 1/9 a week. This was the cause of malnutrition and high mortality, especially among the children.

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